Posts Tagged ‘what to include in a personal statement’

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #10

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009

Natawie Dee

Using our ten-part series on how to write a personal statement that shines as your guide, you now have a rough draft of your personal statement written. The time has come to bring your personal statement to its final version. Part ten of the series shares how to format your statement to make sure that it’s complete and strong.

First, look at the first paragraph of your statement. Is it a strong and attention grabbing opening? Does it make the reader want to finish reading it to find out how it ends? It’s important that your opening paragraph be one of the best paragraphs in the statement. You want to make it compelling enough that it urges the admission officer to read all about you.

After you craft a strong opener, now it’s time to work on the main sections of your personal statement. The supporting paragraphs should spell out the details of the other nine items that should be included in your personal statement (See the nine previous posts if you need a refresher.). And then it’s time for your grand finale. The final paragraph should be a strong conclusion that ties the entire essay together. It’s a reminder of how everything you’ve written comes together. You’ll also want to use your final paragraph to reiterate your interest in attending the college or university to which you’re applying.

Once you work through the ten steps to putting your fabulous personal statement together, you’re ready to add it to your college application package. When you receive your college acceptance letter, it’ll be well worth all of the effort your put into writing it.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #9

Thursday, September 24th, 2009

Robert Voors

The ninth important item you want to be sure to include in your personal statement is a difficulty or difficulties you’ve experienced in your life and the ways you managed to overcome this problem or issues. Again, this is about illustrating your ability to tackle challenges, to be a problem solver and most importantly to learn from what life throws your way.

Choose at least one difficulty that you have overcome and specifically what you learned from having to jump over this hurdle. It may be anything from overcoming your dyslexia through special learning techniques to dealing with the tragic loss of a parent during your teenage years.

Everyone has something in their life that is difficult to handle, so think about roadblocks you’ve run into thus far in your life and use this information to paint a picture of who you really are–using your personal statement as your canvas.

Stay tuned for the last tip on what you need to include in your personal statement to make it shine.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #8

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

David Hughes

Whether it was at your part-time job or in your role as the officer of a club you’re involved with at school, there has been a time in your life when you’ve had to step up to the plate and act as a leader. This is the time to toot your own horn and include this information in your personal statement. Describe specific situations where you had to take on certain responsibilities and what you learned from them.

For example, after being at your customer service job for a few weeks, you noticed that customers were sending in questions faster than the employees could respond, so requests were piling up in the inbox of the company’s email. You suggested and implemented a Frequently Asked Questions Page for the company website where the common questions received from customers were posted along with the answers. This immediately seemed to help in reducing the number of email questions because the information was available to customers upfront. You learned to be proactive to responding to customer needs and to be a problem-solver.

It may also be that you’re the editor of the yearbook, which means you’re responsible for the overall production of the yearbook. From your responsibilities and experiences, you learned how to manage others and motivate the people on the yearbook committee to meet their deadlines. Ultimately, you learned how to take a project (putting together the yearbook) from start to finish.

No matter what type of job you have, volunteer opportunity you’ve been involved with or club you belong to, you have responsibilities associated with it. Use these responsibilities to point out how you shined and what you learned from your experiences. This information shows your motivation and drive. It illustrates that instead of going through the motions of life, you’re actively engaged in the experiences you’re involved in on a daily basis.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #7

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

Hamed Saber

You’re unique. You have characteristics and attributes that make you different from all of the other students that are applying to the college you’re applying to. Use your personal statement as your opportunity to point out your prominent characteristics and the attributes that make you special.

You also need to provide supporting statements to show how these attributes are beneficial to your own personal, educational and career growth. You’ll also want to tie in how the college or university plays a role in helping you to achieve these goals.

The 10-part personal statement series is coming to an end in a few more days, so don’t miss out on the last few items you need to include in your personal statement to make it shine.

If you missed out on the previous six items every personal statement should include, be sure to check out our previous posts. Your personal statement may push you into the acceptance pile over all of the other college applications the admission officer receives.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #6

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Ario

List the skills and awards you have received. You don’t want to be like Napoleon Dynamite and have “no skills,” so it’s important that you are acquiring skills and experiences throughout your high school career.

When you achieve or exceed your goals, you tend to receive awards to celebrate your accomplishments. This too plays an important role in the college admission process. You can acquire skills and earn awards from a part-time job, volunteer opportunities and from the clubs and organizations you’re involved with in after school activities.

When you’re putting together your personal statement it is important to not only point out what your special skills and achievements are, but to also provide information on how you accomplished your achievements or why you received the awards that you have listed.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #5

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

TheAlieness GiselaGiardino²³

Describe your career goals. Everyone has a dream career that they wish to pursue. Your personal statement should include your specific career goals. It shows that you are able to organize your thoughts, set goals and take the steps necessary to achieve your goals. Try not to be too general in sharing your goals. For example, if you want to be a pediatrician or a thoracic surgeon, then say this. Don’t just say you want to be a doctor. You’ll also want to share the reasons you’ve set this career goal. If your work with children during a summer camp program that caters to children with epilepsy made you realize that you want to help treat children then say this. Whatever your reasons, make sure that you share this in your personal statement when addressing your career goals.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #4

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

chrisl_D80/Chris

Today it’s time to learn how you can paint yourself in a bright and glowing light using the personal statement you submit with your college application.

One of the things you want to include in your personal statement is any work experience you may have that is applicable to the area you wish to study. By sharing relevant work experience, you’re showing the admission officer that your interest in pursuing a line of study that will lead to a career is something you take very seriously.

It may also be that your work experience is what sparked your interest in the area of study to begin with. For example, if your summer job was as a camp counselor for children education programs, this may have led to your interest in becoming a teacher. Or maybe your stint at a local medical clinic made you realize that medical research is where your interests lie. Connecting the dots between your experience and interests with what the college can offer you helps to complete the picture.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #3

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

Horia Varlan

Still polishing your personal statement for your college applications?  Learn how to show the college admission office why their college is the right fit for you!

Think of yourself as a matchmaker. What does this college or university offer that makes it the right one for you?

Does it specialize in a specific course of study or is it a  top ranking program?  Match your wants and needs with what your college of choice has to offer.  Explain why it’s important to you — and don’t forget to  include how you became interested in the school.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #2

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

sirwiseowl/Keith Davenport

Applying for college is not as simple as completing the application and submitting it to your top choices. Many colleges ask you to include a personal statement with your application.

While an application requests specific information from you, a personal statement is similar to a personal essay. It allows your personality to shine as you provide added details about who you are as a person, the reasons you want to attend the college you’re applying for and the educational and career goals you have set for yourself. College acceptance is very competitive so creating a personal statement that stands out from the rest can really make the difference.

Everyone has a characteristic, trait or experience that makes them unique. Now is the time for you to figure out what makes you special or impressive. College acceptance is a highly competitive arena, so you need to include in your personal statement something that jumps off the page and grabs the attention of the admission officer or board that is pouring over the mound of applications sitting on their desk. Provide a thorough explanation as to why they should choose you over all of the other applicants that are competing for your position in the institution.

Stay tuned for Part 3 of the series later this week.

Make Your Personal Statement Shine Part #1

Monday, September 7th, 2009

Angelique

Applying for college is not as simple as completing the application and submitting it to your top choices. Many colleges ask you to include a personal statement with your application. While an application requests specific information from you, a personal statement is similar to a personal essay. It allows your personality to shine as you provide added details about who you are as a person, the reasons you want to attend the college you’re applying for and the educational and career goals you have set for yourself. College acceptance is very competitive so creating a personal statement that stands out from the rest can really make the difference.

List and explain your personal experiences and qualifications

The first item you should include in your personal statement is experiences you have had related school, extracurricular activities, community service, or work. Colleges like to see that a student is well-rounded and has participated in a variety of activities inside and outside of the classroom. When you are describing these experiences, make sure to be as specific as possible and supply details about each experience. Talk about how you felt and the lessons that each activity taught you.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of the series later this week.