10 Things You Can Do With a Psychology Degree January 26th, 2016
Psychology Major

10 Psycholgy Career Paths

Choosing a college major is a big step, and one of the most often asked questions when considering is a major is “what can I do with that degree?” Today, we’re covering what you can do with a psychology degree. Our list includes 10 different career paths you could take after studying psychology as an undergraduate.

1. Clinical therapist. This is probably the most commonly thought of job for a psychology graduate. To become a licensed therapist, you may need additional graduate education. Therapists help individuals and families to cope with various life situations, as well as with mental health disorders.

2. High school guidance counselor. Chances are, you’ve interacted with your high school guidance counselor, especially during your college search process. School guidance counselors help students overcome social and behavioral issues, provide counseling to students, help students achieve their academic goals, as well as help students assess potential vocations or career paths. A master’s degree is typically required for employment.

3. Substance abuse counselor. In this field, counselors help individuals coping with addiction or problem behaviors by helping them identify the underlying issues that contribute to the addiction and developing a plan for recovery. A master’s degree is required for a license in this area.

4. Forensic psychologist. These psychologists work with the judicial system. For example, they may meet with inmates or accused criminals to evaluate their mental state at the time of the offense or their competency to stand trial. They also may work with children to prepare them to testify in court or provide assessments of juvenile offenders. Contrary to what is seen on TV shows, forensic psychologists do not often investigate crimes in the field. Again, a graduate degree is typically required.

5. Industrial/organizational psychologist. In this profession, psychologists work with companies and organizations to help increase operational efficiencies, enhance communication and assist with conflict resolution. Essentially, they use various strategies to help teach people to work better. Most industrial/organizational psychologists have at least a master’s degree.

6. Health psychologist. These psychologists help patients cope with an illness and support patients as different emotions related to their illness surface. Health psychologists typically hold a doctorate degree.

7. Researcher. Universities, laboratories or the government may employ psychologists as researchers. Researchers conduct scientific studies on how the brain functions (for example, how concussions incurred during sports games impact the brain long-term). They also conduct experiments to determine solutions or therapies that best work to evaluate or change behaviors. If a researcher works at a university, he or she likely may also teach courses on psychology as well. A doctorate degree is typically required for this career path.

8. Market research analyst. This career path doesn’t require a graduate degree. Bachelor’s degree psychology graduates can get jobs in this field, which focuses on monitoring trends and sales forecasts for businesses, evaluating consumer behavior by gathering and analyzing consumer data, and developing appropriate marketing strategies.

9. Genetics counselor. Genetics counselors work in a health care setting to serve families and individuals who are undergoing genetic testing to identify their risks for certain disorders and diseases. These counselors may help a person determine what type of testing is needed, as well as help a person interpret results and understand the medical and psychological aspects of the test results. A master’s in counseling is typically needed for these jobs, but a bachelor’s degree in psychology can put you on the right career path.

10. Corporate manager. Businesses of all kinds can benefit from hiring psychology graduates in management roles. This is because psychology majors understand better how to interact with employees effectively. An understanding of psychology also can help managers understand customer behavior, which can help companies better determine how to interact with and market products to those customers.

Image credit: Courtesy of Texas A&M University – Commerce Marketing Communications via Flickr Creative Commons

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6 Things to Know Before Filing Your FAFSA January 12th, 2016
Free Application for Federal Student Aid

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

It’s that time of year again—the time of year when high school seniors need to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to be considered for financial aid to help pay for college. The FAFSA is available after January 1 each year for students to fill out. Here are a few things to keep in mind as you fill out (or consider filling out) the FAFSA form.

1. Colleges may require you to fill out FAFSA in order to receive aid or scholarships. Some schools offer merit-based and/or need-based scholarships, or scholarships that incorporate both need and merit. Filling out the FAFSA and sending the information to a college demonstrates you’re serious about considering that school, and it also helps the school find all the potential aid and scholarships you may qualify to receive, getting you the best financial aid package possible.

2. The earlier you submit FAFSA, the better. Many schools have priority dates for filing FAFSA (such as sometime in March through May of your senior year of high school). At many schools, financial aid packages are awarded in the order FAFSA applications are received. That means, there could be more aid available if you’re one of the first students to file FAFSA, than if you’re one of the last. So, don’t procrastinate and get the FAFSA in as soon as possible to maximize the amount of federal and other aid you can receive.

3. Remember to enter college codes before you file. You can send your FAFSA data to up to 10 colleges at a time. Before you submit the form, add the FAFSA school codes for the colleges you’re considering or have already applied to.

4. Gather all necessary documents before you begin. Before you start filling out the FAFSA form, collect all the documents you’ll need to enter information from. Those documents include your parents’ W2s, your parents’ most recent tax return, records of any untaxed income, mortgage information and current bank statements. Also have social security numbers available, and family and student asset information.

5. There’s an online tool to help import tax information. FAFSA has what’s called the IRS Data Retrieval Tool. This tool automatically transfers data from IRS tax returns to the FAFSA form. If you’re eligible to use this tool, it can help speed up the FAFSA filing process.

6. Errors may delay processing. Before you submit the FAFSA, double check the form to ensure it doesn’t have any errors in it—from a simply typo in a name to transposed numbers on social security numbers. And make sure if you used the IRS Data Retrieval Tool that any information imported matches what’s on your parents’ copy of their tax returns. Any errors could delay processing, and delay the time when you get to learn the amount of your financial aid awards.

For more information, visit the FAFSA website.

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Year in Review: Best College Admission Advice of 2015 December 29th, 2015
Best of 2015

Best College Admission Advice of 2015

As 2015 draws to a close, we’re looking back at the college admissions advice we’ve given you and have selected seven of the best tips to remember as we head into 2016. The tips cover everything from saving money for college and exploring campuses to writing better admissions essays and how to deal with college rejections.

1. You can start saving money for college now—even as early as your high school sophomore year. It’s never too early to start saving money for college or applying for college scholarships. As a high school sophomore, you can enter essay contests, get a part-time job, sell some of your old electronics or other items you no longer need, use the library (instead of paying for Netflix or RedBox) to “rent” movies and more.

2. You can explore colleges even before visiting the campus in person. Technology makes it easy to get a taste of what different colleges are like, before you spend the time and money to visit the campus in person. Look for virtual campus tours on each college’s website or check out the college’s social media feeds. In addition, you can look for pre-college programs you can attend in the summer to boost your interest in certain academic areas and get acquainted with a college campus.

3. When applying to colleges, don’t forget the application fees. Knowing how many colleges to apply to is difficult, because it’s different for every person. But as you decide how many colleges is the right amount for you to apply to, consider how much it costs to apply (usually at least $50 or more per school), because you don’t want to break the bank applying to, say 10 colleges, when there are really only five you’re truly considering.

4. The most common college application essay mistake is mentioning the wrong university’s name. Although it may be okay to reuse a college application essay and adapt its content for another school’s application, it’s important to proofread it before you hit Submit. Avoid this common college application essay error by double checking that any mentions of the school name matches the school you are applying to.

5. Don’t overlook proofreading when submitting college application or scholarship essays. Most college admissions officials agree that proofreading your essays and application forms is the most important thing you can do before you submit them. Some strategies to help with proofreading include running a spell check, setting it aside for a day and then coming back to read it with fresh eyes, reading it aloud and reading it backwards.

6. Boost your admission resume by making good use of your school breaks. How you use your summer break from school can tell admissions officials a lot about you. So, consider spending time during school breaks earning money for college, applying for scholarships, doing a job shadow, studying for the ACT or SAT, attending a pre-college summer program, visiting colleges or volunteering.

7. It’s okay if you’re denied admission. It can open up new opportunities. While getting a dreaded college application rejection letter can be a real bummer in the moment, it’s important to keep things in perspective and keep your mind open to other possible colleges that could be just as good as your first choice.

Image credit: Courtesy of Vlado/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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College Majors 101: Biology December 15th, 2015
Biology college major

Biology College Major

Enjoy being outside exploring nature? Love animals or algae? If you want to study living organisms, then a biology major could be a good fit for you. Learn about possible career paths, pay, education requirements, high school preparation and scholarships for biology majors and graduates.

What jobs exist for biology majors?

A biology major could lead to careers in zoology, microbiology, botany and more. You may end up working for the government, a pharmaceutical company, a biomedical engineering company, or even a zoo or aquarium. With graduate education, you also could explore careers such as becoming a veterinarian, doctor or pharmacist.

How much do biologists make?

Annual pay depends on the type of biologist you want to be. Zoologists, for example, have a median annual salary of $57,710, while biologists employed by the federal government have a median annual pay of $72,700. Microbiologists’ overall average median salary is $66,260.

What are the education requirements for biology majors?

Courses for biology majors may include marine biology, ecology, anatomy, plant science and cellular biology, as well as courses in other sciences such as chemistry and physics. Courses often will have a hands-on laboratory component to them.

Many colleges also encourage biology students to participate in undergraduate research—whether with a professor at your college or through a special summer research program at another school.

How can I prepare in high school to major in biology?

Take as many math and science classes as you can. Consider volunteering at your local zoo or animal shelter, or try to arrange a job shadow experience with a biologist who works at a nearby laboratory. Also consider participating in a pre-college summer program that focuses on an area of science.

What scholarships are available for biology majors?

There are many college scholarships available to biology majors. Check with laboratories and national and regional professional organizations, as well as with the university you plan to attend for opportunities.

Examples of available scholarships include the American Council of Independent Laboratories’ Scholarship Alliance, which awards $5,000 scholarships each year, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s undergraduate scholarship program covers up to $45,000 during a student’s junior and senior years of college.

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College Scholarships for High School Students Ending in December 2015 and January 2016 December 1st, 2015
Scholarship Money

Apply for College Scholarships

What better time to apply for college scholarships than during your winter break from school? Check out these nine scholarships, which range in awards from $500 to $50,000.

Also, keep in mind that many universities have their own scholarship deadlines in December and January each year, so if you’re interested in a specific college, look at the school’s financial aid and/or scholarship website to see their scholarship application deadlines, too.

Get started earning money to pay for college by applying for scholarships today.

Most Valuable Student Competition: High school seniors can apply to win one of 500 four-year scholarships from the Elks National Foundation. Criteria includes excellent scholarship, leadership and financial need. Recipients can win prizes from $4,000 up to $50,000. Deadline: December 4

Stephen J. Brady Stop Hunger Scholarship: This $5,000 scholarship is open to students ages 5-25 enrolled at an accredited educational institution in the United States. Applicants must have a demonstrated, ongoing commitment to their community within the past year. The service must include performing volunteer services that impacts hunger in the United States. Deadline: December 5

NFIB Young Entrepreneurs Award: High school seniors can apply for this award. The main requirement is that you must be a young entrepreneur who runs your own small business. Scholarships range between $2,000 and $15,000. Deadline: December 18

Imagine America Foundation Scholarships: Up to five graduating high school seniors may win an award from this scholarship program. Financial need and volunteer service is part of the criteria for this award. Winners receive a $1,000 tuition discount at a participating college. Deadline: December 31

Top Ten List Scholarship: Anyone age 13 and up can apply for this $1,500 scholarship. All you need to do is a write a 250-word (or less) essay with a top ten list of why you should win this scholarship. Deadline: December 31

Unigo $10K Scholarship: Write a 250-word (or less) essay about the biggest challenge facing college students and how it can be addressed. Anyone age 13 and up can apply for this $10,000 scholarship. Deadline: December 31

The Gates Millennium Scholars Program: To be considered for this scholarship, you’ll need to submit a student application and have a nominator and recommender submit appropriate forms regarding your academic record, community service and leadership activities. The scholarships are available to high school seniors who are minorities and who plan to study computer science, education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health or science. Individual scholarship amounts are determined based on financial need. Deadline: January 13

BMW/SAE Engineering Scholarship: BMW and the Society of Automotive Engineers offer this $1,500 scholarship. Applicants must be U.S. residents, have a GPA of at least 3.75, meet certain ACT or SAT score requirements and plan to pursue an engineering or related degree at an accredited institution. Awards may be renewed for three additional years. Deadline: January 15

American Red Cross High School Heroes: According to the Red Cross website, this program is a “is a philanthropic leadership and cash awards program” for students participating in a Red Cross fundraising campaign. Cash awards range from $500 to $5,000. You first apply to participate in the fundraising competition, and then develop a plan and begin fundraising. The top seven fundraisers receive awards. Deadline: January 31 (to apply to participate in program)

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4 Common College Admission Myths Debunked November 17th, 2015
Admission Myths

College Admission Myths

Myths about college admissions abound. Have you been fooled by any? Check out these four common college admissions myths, and learn what the truth really is so you can worry less, and enjoy your high school years (and the college admissions process) more.

Myth #1: There’s only one perfect college for you.

Don’t worry about finding the one school that’s perfect for you or being the prefect candidate for a certain school—there could be several colleges where you would fit in well, even some schools you may not have expected when you began your college search. Simply put in your best effort in high school, and keep an open mind.

Anna Burrelli, admissions counselor at William Peace University (NC), advises students “not to worry and stress so much about being the ‘perfect’ candidate for a college or university [because] if it is meant to be, it is meant to be. The right place for you will be revealed, all in due time.”

Myth #2: You need to know your major before applying.

Of course, it helps to have an idea of what majors or career you might be interested in before you apply so that you can pick a college that has your intended college major. But, knowing your major isn’t a requirement for admission. In fact, many students don’t know what they want to major in when they start college, and students often change their major once they get there.

“Students do not need to have this figured out prior to enrollment,” says Chris Gage, dean of admission at Hanover College (IN). He recommends entering the enrollment process with an open mind.

Myth #3: The method you use to apply to college is important.

In reality, it doesn’t matter whether you submit an application directly to a college using its proprietary application or using the Common Application, says Gage. So don’t worry about which way to submit your app—just submit it and any required documentation such as high school transcripts or ACT or SAT scores.

Myth #4: You need to participate in a specific number of extracurricular activities.

While colleges do like seeing well-rounded students apply to their schools, “there is not a magic number on how many sports or clubs we want students to be involved in,” says Jessie Baker, first-year admissions coordinator at the University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Baker adds, “We would rather see that a student has been seriously involved in three to four organizations for several years versus joining 10 clubs their senior year to look involved. What we want to see is that students have quality involvement in areas that interest them and [students] have taken leadership responsibilities within those organizations.”

In addition, remember that “involvement” doesn’t have to be school-related: It also could be an internship, part-time job or volunteer gig with a community organization.

See more admission myths in the My College Guide 2016 Sophomore Edition.

Image credit: Courtesy of KROMKRATHOG/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Who We Are: Information you can trust. For 20 years My College Guide has produced an annual magazine chock full of free college info for high-achieving high school sophomores and another edition just for high-achieving juniors! Check out our participating colleges.

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8 Tips to Create a College Admissions-Friendly Social Media Presence November 3rd, 2015
Social Media Tips

How to Create a College Admissions-Friendly Social Media Profile

What you say and post online matters. Not just in life, but also in college admissions. A recent Kaplan survey of admissions officers found that 27 percent of them had Googled prospective students and 26 percent had looked up applicants on Facebook. Potential employers look at your online profile, too.

So what can you do to create a profile that will help, not hurt, your chances of getting in to your top choice college?

1. Be yourself. Admissions officials are looking at your online profiles to get a sense of who you truly are, so don’t hide your interests or personality—show them. You don’t have to make posts or tweets sound professional, but write them in your own natural voice. Be cautious, however, that anything you post can’t be interpreted as inappropriate (or illegal!).

2. Use an appropriate photo. Many social media sites provide a space for a photo. Choose a photo of just you, so admissions officials easily know they’re looking at the right person’s profile. Of course, avoid any images that show you partying or participating in behaviors that could be perceived negatively by colleges.

3. Be positive. While’s it’s okay to vent occasionally, nobody wants to see someone complaining all the time (such as complaining about the boss at your part-time job or lamenting about the amount of homework your AP English teacher just gave you), so try to keep a positive spin on your posts or tweets. Share about positive life events such as your excitement about finally completing your English mid-term paper or the great job shadowing experience you had. If you need to vent often, talk to your friends directly or via Snapchat, rather than venting all of your frustrations in a place for admissions officials to see.

4. Avoid curse words. If you wouldn’t say something in front of your grandmother, don’t say it online. Colleges don’t want to see foul-mouthed rants in your feed. They want to see respectful communication.

5. Post about your activities. Did you run in a 5K for charity? Volunteer at the local animal shelter? Take a family vacation? Play on the basketball or volleyball team? Post photos from activities you participate in that show your interests and character.

6. De-tag yourself from inappropriate photos. Your friends may post photos of you and tag you in them, but it doesn’t have to mean they’re all destined to end up on your Facebook feed. If you don’t care for a photo, or don’t think it shows you making the best decisions, you can de-tag yourself from the photos or hide them from your feed.

7. When in doubt, play it safe. If you’re not sure whether something you post could help or hinder your college admissions prospects, err on the side of caution and don’t post it. As the saying goes, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

8. Use privacy settings to monitor what others see. When’s the last time you looked at your social media account’s privacy settings? If there are things you don’t want the public or admissions officials to see, use the privacy settings to restrict access to a full account or to specific posts.

Image credit: Courtesy of Frame Angel/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Who We Are: Information you can trust. For 20 years My College Guide has produced an annual magazine chock full of free college info for high-achieving high school sophomores and another edition just for high-achieving juniors! Check out our participating colleges.

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Transitioning from High School to College: Where to Find Help on Campus October 20th, 2015
Transitioning to College

How to find help when you transition to college

Even straight A students in high school can have difficultly adapting to college life: more freedom, more demanding classes and a little homesickness are just a few of the aspects that can cause you stress. But the good news is that college campuses have many resources to help you, whether you’re struggling academically, personally or emotionally.

Here’s a summary of the services that many colleges offer to help you have a smoother transition.

Academic success or resource centers: Having difficulty keeping up with all the textbook reading? Don’t understand your calculus or physics professor? Need help polishing your mid-term essay? Colleges have many academic support services—from peer or professional tutors to help you with a particularly challenging class or subject, to tools to help improve your test-taking ability and time management skills. Colleges call these services (or groups of services) by different names, but be sure to seek out assistance before it’s too late in the semester.

Counseling and mental health services: Many colleges offer free counseling services to students, so if you’re feeling blue the first few weeks of classes—or anytime during college—remember to schedule an appointment. The counselors can help you work through your feelings and any challenging situations that arise while you’re in school.

Resident assistant (RA): If you live in on campus in the residence halls, you’ll likely have an RA assigned to your floor. The RA not only helps plan activities for your floor, but also is there to help you. So if your roommate is driving you nuts, seek out advice of the RA before taking any drastic measures like finding a new room assignment, moving back home or moving off campus.

Career services: Still undecided about your college major or want to get a jump-start on getting an internship? Seek out the assistance of your college’s career services office. They have tools to help you explore possible interests and majors, as well as find job shadow and internship opportunities.

Academic advisors: An academic advisor may be a staff person or a professor, depending on the college you attend. They are there to help you plan the courses you’ll take and stay on track for graduation. If you have difficulties in any of your classes throughout the semester, your academic advisor can help point you to the right resources on campus to help you succeed.

Financial aid office: Financial situations can change, even during the middle of a semester. If finances to pay for college are a concern, or if your situation changes drastically (such as a parent loses a job, making it difficult for them to help you pay your college bill), go and talk to a financial aid counselor. They can help you find additional aid to help you stay in school and finish your college education.

Disability resources: If you have a learning or physical disability, there should be someone on campus to help you navigate the options available to you through the Americans with Disabilities Act to help you succeed. Seek out this person before you begin classes, so you don’t get behind and have to play catch up.

Student legal services: Some, but not all, universities may offer legal assistance to students. If you find yourself with legal troubles, ask your Student Services director about the options.

Image credit: Courtesy of COD Newsroom via Flickr Creative Commons

Who We Are: Information you can trust. For 20 years My College Guide has produced an annual magazine chock full of free college info for high-achieving high school sophomores and another edition just for high-achieving juniors! Check out our participating colleges.

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College Scholarships for High School Students Ending in October and November 2015 October 6th, 2015
Scholarship Money

Apply for College Scholarships

College scholarships are a great way to help you pay for college. Check out these 10 need-based and/or merit-based scholarships that high school students can apply for in October and November. Remember to check each scholarship website for complete eligibility information and details on how to apply.

Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship: Federal Pell Grant recipients attending a four-year college can apply for this scholarship to help fund a study abroad internship or study program. Awards may be up to $5,000 each. Deadline: October 6

The HotelsCheap Scholarship Program: This need-based scholarship is open to students age 16 and up. The General Scholarship for Higher Learning from this program awards a $1,500 scholarship. Deadline: October 15

Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation College Scholarship Program: If you’ve lost a parent to breast cancer, you may be eligible to apply for this $10,000 scholarship. Deadline: Typically October 15 each year

NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing: The National Center for Women & IT (NCWIT) is “designed to increase women’s meaningful participation in computing careers by providing encouragement, visibility, community, leadership opportunities, scholarships and internships to high potential technically inclined young women.” High school women can apply for this scholarship by filling out an online application. Past winners have received $500 in cash, a laptop computer and a trip to attend an awards ceremony. Deadline: October 26

MyProjectorLamps Scholarship: Two students can win this $500 scholarship. A one-page essay “detailing your ideas about the use of multimedia and data visualization in K-12 classrooms” is required. Deadline: October 31

National Eagle Scout Association (NESA) Scholarships: This scholarship program has moved its application deadline up two months since last year. There are two different types of scholarships you can apply for—academic or merit. Scholarship awards range from $2,500 to $50,000. Applicants must be NESA members. Deadline: October 31

Zombie Apocalypse Scholarship: This $2,000 scholarship is perfect for lovers of “The Walking Dead.” Use your imagination to write a short essay on a plan to avoid zombies if they overrun your school. Deadline: October 31

Jack Kent Cooke Foundation College Scholarship Program: This highly competitive scholarship program is open to high-achieving high school seniors with a financial need. Winners receive up to $40,000 per year to pay for tuition at an accredited four-year college. In addition to financial need, winners are selected based on academic achievement, persistence, a desire to help others and leadership. Deadline: November 1

Ron Brown Scholars Fund: African-American high school students can apply for this scholarship program, which provides a total of $40,000 to each winner ($10,000 for each year of school at a four-year college or university). Awards are given to economically challenged high school seniors who demonstrate an interest in public service, community engagement, business entrepreneurship and global citizenship. Deadline: November 1

Prudential Spirit of Community Awards: This program recognizes students in 9th through 12th grades for their volunteer service to the community. Each school or organization will forward one applicant to the state competition. State finalists will participate in the national competition. State winners receive $1,000 and an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C. National scholarship winners receive an additional $5,000. Deadline: November 3

Education Matters Scholarship: Write a short essay about what would you say to someone who thinks education doesn’t matter, or someone who thinks that college is a waste of time and money to win this $5,000 scholarship. Deadline: November 30

Who We Are: Information you can trust. For 20 years My College Guide has produced an annual magazine chock full of free college info for high-achieving high school sophomores and another edition just for high-achieving juniors! Check out our participating colleges.

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College Fairs 101: How to Find a College Fair Near You September 22nd, 2015
College Fair

College Fairs 101

College fairs are a great way to meet admission representatives and learn information about colleges you may not have thought to consider. They’re a unique opportunity to ask questions about college majors, student activities and scholarships available at a particular school. You’ll also start to learn about what the colleges really value by what information the admission reps share with you.

There are many college fairs with events in the fall and some in the spring. Here’s a look at college fairs you could attend.

NACAC national college fairs: Each fall and spring the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) holds free college fairs in cities across the country. See the full schedule to find a college fair near you.

Online college fairs: In recent years, virtual college fairs have been emerging. These fairs allow you to meet admission reps from the comfort of your own home by offering live online chats with admission reps. Sites like CollegeFairsOnline.com and CollegeWeekLive.com offer these types of fairs. Check their websites for specific college fair dates.

State and regional college fairs: Several regional and state organizations host college fairs. To find a college fair in your state, Google the terms college fair with your state’s name, such as college fair connecticut or college fair texas. For example, the Rocky Mountain Association for College Admission Counseling hosts college fairs in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona.

Before you go to a college fair, check out My College Guide’s previous article on “Preparing for the College Fair: What to Know Before You Go.”

Image credit: Courtesy of Lacey Loftin, Metro College Fair via Flickr Creative Commons.

Who We Are: Information you can trust. For 20 years My College Guide has produced an annual magazine chock full of free college info for high-achieving high school sophomores and another edition just for high-achieving juniors! Check out our participating colleges.

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